Conservative News & Commentary

Jan 5, 2015 — by: P. Henry
Categories: Government

GavelTomorrow, the U.S. House of Representatives will face the most important vote they will encounter for the next two years. On Tuesday, January 6, 2015 the House will vote for their next Speaker. The reason this is the most important vote cast by each Representative is because of the enormous power the Speaker has on how the U.S. House of Representatives is governed. If you get on the Speaker’s naughty list, chances are you will not get a good committee assignment, your bills will never make it out of committee and do not expect any funding to come your way for re-election.

The Speaker’s position is also very important from a PR perspective. Not only does this office wield the gavel when it comes to legislation, this is the office that the DC Press look to when there is a divided government in order to find a contrary opinion to the President’s. It is therefore crucial to have someone in power who can clearly articulate the conservative point of view and why it is best for the country.

Finally the Speaker’s office is powerful because it was made that way by the Founders. They put the order of Presidential succession:

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Dec 18, 2014 — by: A. Smith
Categories: Culture

Baby, abortion, right to lifeI am a pro-life, conservative Christian. I believe life is one of the three unalienable rights — Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness — guaranteed by the Constitution, and the three items that the Federal Government is mandated to protect for its citizens. Extinguishing innocent human life prematurely is not morally permissible no matter the size, the age, the location or the level of development of any person. This is something that I believe Oregon Right to Life and I can agree on. Matter of fact Oregon Right To Life’s policy page states,

“Oregon Right to Life believes in the sanctity of all human life from the moment of conception to natural death. We are opposed to abortion under any circumstances except where the life of the mother is in imminent danger.”

Bravo. So how does this organization fail in a disastrous way towards fulfilling this mission? By endorsing federal candidates who only politically align themselves with Oregon Right to Life in order to gain an endorsement and/or to eliminate potential challengers.

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Nov 24, 2014 — by: A. Smith
Categories: Government

ConstitutionHere we stand. The U.S. Constitution has been trampled on by our President, issuing yet another executive order making law — without Congress — that those who had broken the lass of our land and entered the country illegally were now welcomed guests — with no doubt an invitation coming shortly to become citizens.

The challenge we face is two fold:

  1. How are we going to stop President Obama from doing further damage via his fiat pen?
  2. Who is going to undo this damage when President Obama is out of office?

The first question is, will our Republican led congress do anything of substance to stop Obama? This means more than using Obama’s actions for a GOP fundraisers or for raising the hackles on the back of our necks so we support the GOP. No, Obama took action. Now it is our turn. But will the GOP do likewise — take real action — to stop this and future unconstitutional acts? Congress controls the purse, so there is an wide swath of pressure they can place upon the White House — but will they take real action or will they just talk? Watch your congressman, watch your senators and watch the upcoming candidates for the 2016 GOP nomination. Talk is cheap. Real, substantiative action is what we need.

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Oct 15, 2014 — by: A. Smith
Categories: Economics, Government, Culture

... and Emotional People Will Vote Yes

Rational vs. Emotional

It has been interesting to watch the latest round of “we need more money for the children” telethon. Of course I’m talking about the advocates for Bond Measure 18-99. If passed, the Klamath Falls School District (KFSD) will get a loan of $36,000,000 that the tax-payers in the district will be on the hook for the next 20 years. The economic impact is that over $2 million each year will be transferred from the citizens of Klamath Falls to the special interest consortium of banking, construction and real estate.

The Yes crowd’s claim is that this bond measure will benefit the children. It is a pure emotional plea. There is no real thinking behind it. In the final analysis it is some personal feeling that drives the Yes vote. In reality this bond measure does nothing for the children except to make their parents poorer while doing nothing to fix the real problem in Klamath County — education.

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Oct 11, 2014 — by: P. Henry
Categories: Economics, Government, Culture

Grumpy teacher

Public teachers often get a pass. They get to claim their main reason for being a public school teacher is that they care about the kids and that they love teaching. While they may complain about the work at times, how difficult students can be, if we dare challenge this core motive — caring for children — we are instantly made out to be demons with horns and pitch fork.

However, it is my belief that for most public school teachers this is a smoke screen, that caring for students and their education is not their core motive. So how do I prove to you my hypothesis, that most public school teachers really care more about something else than their students and their education? It can be done with two simple questions.

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Sep 24, 2014 — by: J. Madison
Categories: Government

Smart-conservativesYes, I'm serious with that question: Are Conservatives Smart? I don’t mean in an IQ kind of way, but more in a street-smart, politically-savvy kind of way. The more I travel conservative circles and hear responses from those who claim to be conservative, the more I am inclined to think we conservatives are not politically smart.

One such item that bothers my colleague, G.W. Washington, and myself is the inability of conservatives to see the long-view on the political landscape. Conservatives are mostly about the next election. Rarely, if ever, have I been in the presence of conservatives and learn about their 20-, 10- or even 5-year plan. Why? Because most conservatives do not think that far ahead. Conservatives are easily angered by liberals and progressive policies, vowing to do all they can to get rid of the bums in Washington, Salem or Klamath Falls. However, if doing so requires building a strategic 10-year plan, all bets are off. Conservatives can not seem to seem to see beyond hill just in front of them.

This is why conservatives play defense so much of the time. We seem to be always voting “No” to liberal agendas. Very rarely are conservatives putting ballot initiatives together in order to move their agenda forward. Where is the ballot measure to make County Commissioners partisan again? Where is the ballot initiative to require 50% of voters to approve any sort of new tax or levy? Where are the ballot initiatives to lower property taxes? Where are they? Of course every now and then there are exceptions. But you will see this play out if you look at your November ballot. Notice that there is not one conservative agenda on the ballot — all of the ideas and ballot measures are progressive ones.

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Sep 23, 2014 — by: G.W. Washington
Categories: Government

Voting-checkboxProblem: Your general ballot for congressman, governor, senator, state representative, county commissioner or city council person does NOT contain a conservative candidate. The general election is between a moderate Republican and a Democrat (who is liberal — that pretty much goes without saying). The common retort is to “vote as conservative as you can”. In other words, hold your nose and vote for the Republican, because it will be better than having a Democrat in office — or so the thinking goes.

This has been the conventional wisdom for about 50 years. Let me ask, how’s this advice working out? Do moderate Republicans deliver on conservative agendas? Are we moving in a more conservative direction as a country and as a community?

This advice, while helping ease our conscious, does little to help to move any conservative agenda forward, and actually does much harm. Why? Because moderate Republicans are not in the business of upsetting the status quo. Moderate Republicans find their home in better managing the current systems put in place by liberal Democrats. Think about it. Where is the outcry from the National Republican party over Obamacare? At first opposition and repeal language was loud and large, but recently have you heard anything? If asked, the GOP will say they can't do anything until the have control of the Senate. But stop and think, is this the overarching theme from the Republican party for their Senate candidates? Do you think once in control of the Senate the GOP will repeal Obamacare? Or do you think the GOP will instead try to make Obamacare better and more manageable? Will they work with the President on some sort of compromise to get something done? If you guessed the second answer, you're getting it. Moderate candidates and legislators are all about being liked and getting along. That’s how they get re-elected — which is their #1 goal that supersedes all other policy matters. Fighting to tear down a bureaucracy is not in their nature and therefore they won't take a stand unless there is complete political cover for such an action. Why? Because tearing down a government program means people benefiting from the program become upset. When people get upset they make a lot of noise and demonize the person taking away their freebie. Moderates melt in such conditions like an ice cube on the equator. Therefore moderates avoid any such activity of undoing government programs and bureaucracies put in motion by Democrats.

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Aug 13, 2014 — by: J. Madison
Categories: Government

George Washington, Constitutional Convention, 1878

When the Founders Fathers passed our Constitution in 1787, the idea of a representative republic was a grand idea — an experiment — as no one in power had ever executed such a distributive model for governance. At the end of the constitutional convention, Ben Franklin answered the question about what form of government the convention had created by stating, “A Republic, if you can keep it.”

Franklin, as well as the others in attendance, knew this idea of a representative republic would only work as long as regular citizens served as our representatives. Our first president George Washington set the example of returning to private life after only two terms as President. Washington said when being asked to run for a third term, “I had rather be in my grave than in my present situation, I had rather be on my farm than be emperor of the world; and yet they charge me with wanting to be a king.”

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Jul 10, 2014 — by: J. Madison
Categories: Economics, Government, Culture

Havana-cuba

During the past week, A.Smith wrote several articles about how to make Klamath County a better community. He has told me he has many, many more ideas, “My ways to improve this county are nearly endless. I can always think of some new and helpful way government can make life better and easier for Klamath County residents.” A.Smith claims he has ideas to create a special levy for:

  • Park Beautification for only $0.05/$1,000 — residents always enjoy beautiful parks
  • Public Safety for only $0.25/$1,000 — to ensure jails are always open keeping criminals locked up
  • County Trapper for only $0.05/$1,000 — to ensure wolves and coyotes don’t negatively effect livestock. Maybe even two or three trappers instead of just one for only $0.10/$,1000
  • County Lunch Service for only $0.07/$1,000— Free Lunches on Wednesday provided by the county for those who can’t afford a decent meal and are starving
  • County Detox Center for only $0.15/$1,000 — so we don’t use jail space to sober up people drunk or high
  • County School Improvement for only $1.50/$1,000 — to rebuild/rennovate all county school buildings over 50 years old
  • Senior Center Expansion for only $0.12/$1,000 — to expand the senior center program to have satillite locations throughout the county, not just in Klamath Falls.
  • Economic Development Upgrade for only $0.58/$1,000 — to better fund and expand KCEDA, the Klamath County Chamber of Commerce, and SCCOED.

Like he said, his list is nearly endless (and yes, he has many, many more ideas). If you think all of these ideas, including the four he wrote about previous (County Coffee Shops, County Library, County Museum, County Daycare CentersCounty Airport), are wonderful then you also think adding $4.44/$1,000 to existing taxes is also a fine idea. Of course no one would ever propose a $4.44 levy in Klamath. That would never pass. So the trick is to offer one, maybe two at a time and over time the public is gullible enough to pass them, especially if it makes the community better or helps the poor and the children.

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Jul 9, 2014 — by: A. Smith
Categories: Economics, Government, Culture

SkywestKlamath County was dealt a serious economic blow on June 5th, as SkyWest stopped service to the newly renamed Crater Lake - Klamath Regional Airport (aka Klamath Falls Airport). Now the only way to fly into Klamath County is via a private charter or through the Rogue Valley Airport and then catch a shuttle/rent-a-car to Klamath. Without direct commercial air service to Klamath County, it makes doing business in and with Klamath businesses much more difficult. Another way to state this is to say many companies won't do business with Klamath County enterprises because there is no longer any direct commercial air service.

The Crater Lake - Klamath Regional Airport is owned and operated by the City of Klamath Falls. However, the county government derives benefits such as the tourism tax on hotel stays, as well as other taxes gleaned through increased commerce in the county. That said, the county does not current contribute any operational funding or services to the airport.

Since commerce and connectivity to the outside world is vital to Klamath County’s economy and livability, we think that should change. A special tax levy of just $0.08/$1,000 could help raise funds to lure another commercial airline to service Klamath Falls (and the surrounding county). With this new funding in place we can be assured that a new airline won't just come or go based on how the economy is doing. Instead direct air service to Klamath County would be stable, predictable and consistent, once and for all.

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