Conservative News & Commentary

Government

Jul 14, 2011 — by: B. Franklin
Categories: Government

Cheryl Hukill, Al Switzer

Earlier this week it was reported that Chuck Collins & Company have abandoned their attempt to recall Klamath County Commission Cheryl Hukill. Instead they will focus on recalling Commissioner Al Switzer only. According to Collins the reason for this change of heart is because they don't want Governor Kitzhauber selecting a county commissioner. Interesting how this wasn't discovered before their recall campaign began. I think I mentioned this in my last blog post — yeah, I did (see the fifth paragraph).

While this might be an honest admission it begins to reveal Collin's effort is an emotionally driven campaign, not a rational one. It's like the teen boy who wants to borrow his parents car for the evening. The dad says, "No you can't...." and the teenager then throws a tantrum on how his dad is unfair, and mean, and doesn't care about him or his friends. When the teen is done with his rant, the Dad explains, "... I wasn't finished. Let me try again. You can't have the car tonight,... because it is out of gas. If you have money to fill the tank, then you can use the car." In the same way, Collins & Company have decided to throw a tantrum because they don't like something. Their tantrum is to recall Al & Cheryl whom they feel most responsible for the damage done to "public safety" among other items. That said, don't you think the rational approach would've been to have first gather the facts about how replacement commissioners would be selected instead of first starting a recall for both?

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Jun 29, 2011 — by: B. Franklin
Categories: Government

In Tuesday's H&N, the big story was, "Citizen starts recall effort". Before I begin to analyze the article, notice how the H&N makes this action in itself seem noble. It wasn't a person nor was it a resident. No, no. it was a citizen — inferring that this recall petition is an act of citizenry, an honorable act. No need to go any further and measure whether or not this action make sense or whether it is just. Nope, because a citizen has bravley brought this petition forth, it is now noble. By their headline, the H&N has declared it so and therefore set the tone for their report.

While I could spend an entire article talking about the motives of the H&N, it is more prudent to focus on the act of Chuck Collins (he's the virtuous citizen in this story).

According the H&N, Mr. Collins claims that the two commissioners have not,

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Jun 27, 2011 — by: P. Henry
Categories: Government

Who said there is no such thing as a free lunch?

According to the Wall Street Journal Online, participants in the Federal Food Stamp program grew from 26 Million in 2007 to over 44 million this year. That's nearly a 70% jump in just four years. Another way to look at it is that every month, another 375,000 Americans become food stamp recipients.

America is no longer a nation of food producers; instead we are becoming a nation of food stamp recipients.

Here's an interesting question, what does the government require in return for food stamps? Yes, you read that correctly, what does the government require the food stamp recipient in return for free food? Only that you don't make too much money. Interesting. Here's a little story to illustrate:

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Jun 22, 2011 — by: P. Henry
Categories: Government

Uncle Sam hat

Last week we reported on the awful consequences of giving away food during the summer months — thanks to Uncle Sam's generosity. [see “Who said there's no such thing as a free lunch?”]

In that article we reported that not only was did the Herald & News misrepresent the food-give-away program by pretending it had something to do with encouraging childhood literacy during the summer months, but then we found an ad in the paper —not just one day, but several days in a row — promoting the program.

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Jun 16, 2011 — by: P. Henry
Categories: Government

Summer Lunch & Story Time — H&N Wed. June 8, 2011. If you missed it, the pictures and the headlines describe a wonderful summertime program for children sponsored by the Klamath County Library and Integral Youth Services.

If you don't read through the entire article you are likely to think that children will be encouraged to read during the summertime while receiving a nutritious lunch. However, if you do read the entire story, you'll find out the program is little more than free food for children ages 1-18 who show up to a certain location at a certain time. However, only three of the 27 locations are at a library, where books are. Moreover, stories are going to be read to them. There is no indication that children will be "encouraged the read". What about the other 24 locations? Free, nutritious lunches for children 1-18, period.

What are the odds of a 1-year old going to this food-give-away alone? Right, mom, dad or someone will have to take them... oh yeah, and they can get food too. We all know how this works: the lunches are already made and will spoil if not eaten. This is not a for-profit enterprise it is a government give-away program so the more lunches given away the better it looks for the program. Matter of fact the program boasts that last year 600-700 lunches were given away each day — almost 29,000 during the summer.

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Jun 6, 2011 — by: A. Smith
Categories: Government

Some say it's not polite to speak the truth in such a bold fashion. Others say not to hold back but just to speak your mind. There is probably some wisdom in both and knowing when to apply each bit of wisdom makes one, well, wise.

Klamath County is suffering a terrible time economically. A 13+% unemployment rate is awful for even one quarter but Klamath has been dealing with this reality for over two years — with no end in sight. Reality is rearing its ugly face and with the national economy set to double-dip into another recession, Klamath residents are holding on for dear life.

The cold, hard facts are that our community, our county, our state and our nation thrive only when capitalism is allowed to thrive. Our county does not work, when 13% are not working. Our county does not work when public employee sector jobs are the envy of the jobless or those gainfully employed! Mark Belling substituted for Rush Limbaugh today and uttered this profundity,

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May 30, 2011 — by: A. Smith
Categories: Government

Sunday's Herald & News’ feature article was titled, “How Much We Pay Our Public Employees”. The paper outlined several different public employees with salaries above $50,000, $100,000 and even $200,000. With the Klamath County unemployment rate hovering well above 10%, that report ought to make a few folks a little jealous if not angry.

That said, we applaud the paper’s investigation and reporting. These are public employees that get paid by us. We ought to know what they are making. Moreover, we ought to be able to control how much they make, but sadly often can't.

The Old Lemonade Stand

As children many of us made a lemonade stand to earn a little summer money. We'd find a box, make a sign, stake out a good place on the front lawn where passers by would notice us, and of course made the best pitcher of lemonade we could.

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May 27, 2011 — by: B. Franklin
Categories: Government

Herald & News

In the May 26th edition of the Herald & News, editor Steve Miller whines about the fact that the Herald & News’ request for county documents will cost the paper more than it can afford to spend.

“Finally, after months, county officials are responding formally to our records request. And Guess what? They seem to be telling us that the records we want could be available, all we have to do is pay for them. And pay a lot, more than we feel we can afford, actually.”  — Editor Steve Miller of the Herald & News, page A3, May 26, 2011

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May 24, 2011 — by: A. Smith
Categories: Government

This May's election had two ballot measures to help fund the County Museums and the County Jail. Both were property tax levies that issued a $0.05/$1,000 and $0.29/$1,000 tax respectively — so $0.34/$1,000 in total if both passed.

The two organizations are short of funds because of the downturn in tax revenue due of the recession, and lack-luster "recovery".  The County Museums lost all their funding when the Klamath County Commissioners decided to not fund the upcoming year through the general fund. The County Jails have been in an awful sorts for about a year now operating with only one or two of the three jail pods "open for business". The passage of both measures would've ensured the County Museums could continue as previously and that the County Jail would at a minimum have two pods open for the foreseeable future.

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